April 20, 2014

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A Penny For Your Thoughts

THE POWER OF POWER

One of the most inconvenient things to experience is losing electric power during 102° weather. (Now, I didn’t say, “The worst thing, I said, “one of the worst.”)

The recent storm which went through on Friday, June 29, destroyed hundreds of power poles and left a path of destruction for miles. We were one of many, many residences that did not see the power restored for eight days. What an experience.

The first night of the power outage we trekked to Van Wert and attempted to buy ice and water. Needless to say, everyone was thinking the same thing and alas all the ice was already sold.

We did get lucky and got a case of bottled water and thought that should last us and we thought that our power would only be out for maybe a day. (Of course, we were charged $6.25.)

Saturday came and we began to get rumblings around town that this storm had been very, very vicious and there were thousands without power. We also were told it would be several days before it would be restored.

The temperatures steadily rose and hit close to 104°. In a day’s time, we became hot and a little bit cranky. It was nice and cool just to jump in the car, turn on the air conditioning and ride around.

In our little village, everyone has septic tanks and wells, so we did not have water for toilets, baths, showers or anything. By Saturday afternoon, we were panting and trying just to endure the heat, the dark, and lack of conveniences.

We went to a nearby town and thought we would perhaps buy a small generator. We were in luck as one of the big farm stores was taking prepaid orders for generators and they had a truck load coming in on Sunday evening. (Perhaps this would help us.)

We returned to the store on Sunday night to pick up the generator. Everyone was to drive to the back of the store’s loading dock and wait their turn in line. It took us over one hour to pick up the generator, but it was worth the wait.

It took time to get the generator hooked up at home and we were very careful what we plugged into it. I had already lost all of the food in my refrigerator, but my freezer contents had stayed frozen. Needless to say that is one appliance we connected.

While the generator was a big assistance, the temperature inside the house still hovered near 85°. It would be another long week before we would get our power restored.

When I complained, and trust me I did, people said to me, “Well, what do you think they did in the olden days?”

My response was, “They were used to the heat and the cold, plus, they did not know the conveniences we have today.”

Yes, I recall when I was young the memories of not having air conditioning or TV. I remember the old out- house and of pumping water from a well. That is how we lived. All of this made me sit up and take notice of how dependent we all are on electricity.

Maybe I am spoiled, because I do enjoy my air conditioning, TV, the internet, and running water. These are things I just take for granted.

The week of the “storm” had lots of things happening. I will let you know some exciting news in next week’s column.

How did you manage during the power outage? Did you get cranky? How did you tolerate the heat? Let me know and I’ll give you a Penny for Your Thoughts.THE POWER OF POWER

One of the most inconvenient things to experience is losing electric power during 102° weather. (Now, I didn’t say, “The worst thing, I said, “one of the worst.”)

The recent storm which went through on Friday, June 29, destroyed hundreds of power poles and left a path of destruction for miles. We were one of many, many residences that did not see the power restored for eight days. What an experience.

The first night of the power outage we trekked to Van Wert and attempted to buy ice and water. Needless to say, everyone was thinking the same thing and alas all the ice was already sold.

We did get lucky and got a case of bottled water and thought that should last us and we thought that our power would only be out for maybe a day. (Of course, we were charged $6.25.)

Saturday came and we began to get rumblings around town that this storm had been very, very vicious and there were thousands without power. We also were told it would be several days before it would be restored.

The temperatures steadily rose and hit close to 104°. In a day’s time, we became hot and a little bit cranky. It was nice and cool just to jump in the car, turn on the air conditioning and ride around.

In our little village, everyone has septic tanks and wells, so we did not have water for toilets, baths, showers or anything. By Saturday afternoon, we were panting and trying just to endure the heat, the dark, and lack of conveniences.

We went to a nearby town and thought we would perhaps buy a small generator. We were in luck as one of the big farm stores was taking prepaid orders for generators and they had a truck load coming in on Sunday evening. (Perhaps this would help us.)

We returned to the store on Sunday night to pick up the generator. Everyone was to drive to the back of the store’s loading dock and wait their turn in line. It took us over one hour to pick up the generator, but it was worth the wait.

It took time to get the generator hooked up at home and we were very careful what we plugged into it. I had already lost all of the food in my refrigerator, but my freezer contents had stayed frozen. Needless to say that is one appliance we connected.

While the generator was a big assistance, the temperature inside the house still hovered near 85°. It would be another long week before we would get our power restored.

When I complained, and trust me I did, people said to me, “Well, what do you think they did in the olden days?”

My response was, “They were used to the heat and the cold, plus, they did not know the conveniences we have today.”

Yes, I recall when I was young the memories of not having air conditioning or TV. I remember the old out- house and of pumping water from a well. That is how we lived. All of this made me sit up and take notice of how dependent we all are on electricity.

Maybe I am spoiled, because I do enjoy my air conditioning, TV, the internet, and running water. These are things I just take for granted.

The week of the “storm” had lots of things happening. I will let you know some exciting news in next week’s column.

How did you manage during the power outage? Did you get cranky? How did you tolerate the heat? Let me know and I’ll give you a Penny for Your Thoughts.