April 17, 2014

Subscriber Login



Don't have a username and password? Phone 419-399-4015 or email subscription@progressnewspaper.org to get yours today.
Click the E-Editions image below to see E-editions of the Progress, Weekly Reminder and special sections

Polls

Should the county emergency management agency office duties be a separate office?
 
Midweek severe storm risk includes possible derecho
Latest
Monday, June 10, 2013 7:32 PM

 

By Alex Sosnowski, Expert Senior Meteorologist for AccuWeather.com

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. – AccuWeather.com reports complexes of strong, drenching and locally severe thunderstorms will reach from parts of South Dakota and Nebraska to Illinois, Ohio, western Pennsylvania and the Virginias during the middle of this week.

Part of this area could be hit by an intense thunderstorm complex, known as a derecho.

The pattern of thunderstorm complexes has the potential to bring localized incidents of flash flooding, damaging wind gusts, hail and frequent lightning strikes along a 1,000-mile swath spanning Tuesday, Wednesday and perhaps Thursday.

Travel delays caused by thunderstorms, poor visibility and flooded roadways are possible in some locations. There is a risk of downed trees, property damage and power outages and in a few neighborhoods.

The storms will affect areas on the Plains bound roughly by I-80 and I-90 Tuesday. During Wednesday, assuming the storms begin to turn to the right as they often do in these situations, the risk will shift to the Midwest and central Appalachians in areas approximately from I-64 to I-80.

Cities in the path of the storms include Sioux Falls, S.D., Des Moines, Iowa, Chicago, Indianapolis, Detroit, Cleveland, Cincinnati , Pittsburgh and Charleston, W.Va.

Some locations could be hit by more than one thunderstorm complex. In parts of the East, the storms will hit in the wake of Andrea's rainfall and additional storms early this week. In these areas the risk of flooding will be multiplied.

The most intense, fastest-moving and longest-distance version of these is known as a derecho. These most severe thunderstorm complexes can bring wind damage to a large area, along a path covering hundreds of miles.

A derecho is challenging to predict, but there is a possibility of a derecho forming in the thunderstorm pattern this week. Derechoes evolve from thunderstorm complexes.

Depending on exactly where the parent complex of storms forms, the derecho could then track from the Midwest into part of the central Appalachians and the coastal mid-Atlantic given the steering winds and building heat to the south expected later this week.

PROGRESS NOTE: The Weather Channel echoes this forecast. The following information is taken from weather.com site:

A squall line of severe thunderstorms with a significant threat of damaging straight-line winds looms for parts of the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes Wednesday, possibly shifting into the Mid-Atlantic States by Thursday.

TWC's Exclusive TOR:CON Index

Wednesday, June 12

Scattered severe thunderstorms, possibly in clusters or even a derecho (widespread damaging wind event associated with a bow echo thunderstorm pattern) in northeast IA, south WI, north half IL, north IN, south MI, OH, southwest PA, north and central WV, MD, DC, north VA.

 

 

Comments 

 
#1 2013-06-10 21:03
Read WANE TV's Jonathon Conder's blog post. He is a trained meteorologist and storm chaser and said it is irresponsible for websites to be posting that this is a possibility. It's origination was from a website looking to get hits. I'm just letting everyone know that the possibility is very slim and almost impossible to actually predict.
Quote
 

Add comment

Free speech is the principle under which newspapers operate. The Progress welcomes your comments, suggestions and opinions that further discussion from all sides of an issue. We consider this an important element of the user experience on progressnewspaper.com. The Progress will not permit hate speech, personal attacks, profanities, irrelevant sexual references, threats, libel or spam. In general, comments that violate the Progress’ guidelines will be deleted. For more information or to report abuse, email progress@progressnewspaper.org.

Security code
Refresh