July 30, 2014

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These are a few of my favorite trees
Wednesday, September 04, 2013 1:28 PM

By Kylee Baumle

Fall is approaching and as someone who has close to 100 trees on this acre of land we live on, this means leaf raking. Raking, because in spite of leaves being a great mulch if they’re small, ours are not.

We have several oaks that are over 200 years old, as determined by a formula for measuring, specific to oaks. As anyone who has oak trees in their yard knows, these are dirty trees, dropping not only acorns in the fall, but copious amounts of leaves. All. Year. Long.

Our property was once a woods, as much of Paulding County was. It was only in the 1970s that it was cleared for building. When we bought the two-year-old house in 1977, there were only six trees here, three oaks, two maples, and a shagbark hickory. All six are still here, although one large oak has lost its eastern half, thanks to a storm.

 
In case of emergency
Wednesday, September 04, 2013 1:27 PM

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

By Nancy Whitaker

Most of us working at the office are organized; at least we think we are. When it comes to our desks and work stations, it is pretty much up to each of us as to what we want on and in our desks.

Of course there are the necessities such as: paper clips, rulers, tape, scissors and rubber bands. Personally, I like keeping my necessities out on my desk so I can have quicker access to them.

Of course, there is the phone, the computer, and file folders on my desk which I use every day. I also have business cards, pens, pencils and a stapler. So far so good.

 
King of the road?
Wednesday, September 04, 2013 1:25 PM

King of the road?

By Nancy Whitaker

Driving etiquette should be a part of every Drivers Ed course. I, for one, hate it when someone pulls out in front of me, tailgates me, or passes me when there is another car coming. I tend to say “##*****@@@” and not very quietly either.

I can never quite understand how people can pull out in front of me and never even see me coming. A lot of times, I just wonder if they are in that big of a hurry or if they just aren’t paying attention.

A couple of weeks ago, I was driving around a parking lot and someone with a truck decided to back up. They came within inches of hitting me and I thought for sure I would wind up with a dented car. I could not back up, because someone was behind me, so I did the next logical thing I knew to do, which was lay on my horn.

 
Walk a mile in my shoes
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 3:01 PM

By Jim Langham

I can’t imagine what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a waitress, but both of my daughters used to fill me in when they came home from an evening's work at a nearby eatery.

“This one lady is so nice, she always asks us how we are doing and seems like she really cares about us.”

“There’s this couple that comes in and you can never make them happy, never! They are always going to find something wrong with their place setting, food and the way that I serve them. My heart droops every time they walk in.”

 
Wolves in sheep's clothing
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 2:59 PM

 

By Kylee Baumle

As we drive along our rural Paulding County roads, the predominate color of the landscape in August is green. It’s considerably greener this year than in past years and certainly greener than 2012, but there are little pops of color here and there.

White is a color too and there’s an abundance of Queen Anne’s lace, oftentimes interspersed with lavender chicory. The goldenrod is beginning to bloom, as is the deep purple ironweed (aptly named, if you’ve ever tried to pick some barehanded for a bouquet).

In the ditches, you can find the pink blooms of both common and swamp milkweed, although much of that is going to seed by now. But there’s a deeper pink, a more vibrant, almost neon pink that can be seen in various spots around the county.

 
Love 'em all
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 2:58 PM

 

LOVE ’EM ALL

By Nancy Whitaker

I remember my grandma telling me when I was little, “You should love everyone, but you don’t have to like their actions or their ways.”

I like to believe we have all been in love with somebody or some thing. One of the strongest bonds of love is between a mother and her children. I guess I call this, “Motherly love.”

One of my truest deepest loves is for my children and grandchildren. Even though my children are all grown up, I still worry about them, pray for them and love them with all my heart.

 
The writings of Gene Stratton-Porter
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 1:37 PM

 

By Jim Langham

There’s not a day goes by that is not inspired at some point by the writing and philosophy of an author who was referred to in her time as the “first woman botanist” in America.

 
Candy Kisses
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 1:36 PM

CANDY KISSES

By Nancy Whitaker

I think one of my favorite things in the whole world is candy. Candy is sweet, lifts the spirits and is a tantalizing morsel made to tickle our taste buds.

Through the years, I have tasted many kinds of candy and can recall the many varieties we used to have. When I was little, I would go down to the local grocery store and stand for hours in front of the candy counter, deciding what kind of candy I wanted to spend my few pennies on. Yes, back then you could get a piece or two of candy for a penny.

One kind of candy I have never cared for is licorice. At one time all licorice was black and tasted nasty to me. My taste buds were not tickled at all by that strong anise flavored candy.

 
It's a small world after all
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 1:35 PM

By Kylee Baumle

In the last few years, because of my garden writing, I’ve had the opportunity to travel to some places I’ve never been. I get to meet some industry professionals as well as other backyard gardeners and it’s satisfying to connect with others who share this passion for growing.

We all have our “small world” stories, those circumstances where we’re hundreds of miles from home and we run into someone from our hometown, or we find out that we have a mutual friend, though the two of us have never before heard of one another.

While gardening is a widespread pastime for many, in the grand scheme of things, it’s a pretty small niche, especially when you consider those who take it to a level where it plays a part in how they make a living.

 
He is just a dog
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 1:31 PM

He is just a dog

By Bill Sherry

In his column “Homespun,” Jim Langham wrote last week, “It has been 12 years since our home experienced the loss of our last dog. Our Benji, which really did look like a Benji, had gone to his reward, the end of a lifetime chain of ‘departing dog broken hearts.’” What a statement – is that all there is for our dog friends, who are always willing to wag their tails in happiness to see us come through the door, bring their favorite toy and drop it at our feet because they want to play, or do all those doggie tricks for a small treat and a pat on the head? I am afraid so; our dog friends go through life trying to please us and taking our rejection and sometimes neglect with their tails wagging in hope to hear us say “Good Doggie.”

 
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