August 28, 2014

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One thing that ticks me off...
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 2:22 PM

 

Guest Column By Susan Pieper

One thing that ticks me off...

One thing that ticks me off is receiving anonymous letters. Today I received one with a photocopied list of leaders of non-profits and their high salaries. And, there was another list of charities this person thought were more worthy of support. They even took the time to jot a note to me stating that “this is why people do not want to give to United Way.” I suppose they sent it to me because they know I support United Way and the library is the Pacesetter for this year’s United Way campaign.

Paulding County United Way pays about $500 a year to United Way Worldwide which in turn provides training and educational opportunities to all United Way organizations which includes an online discussion list – an invaluable tool especially for smaller United Way organizations. It allows our small county to “link up” with like-sized groups.

 
I can tell by your accent
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 2:18 PM

By Jim Langham

When I was a child, our family visited my Aunt Norma (who once ran The Green Pantry Restaurant in Antwerp) and my Uncle Art at their home in Jacksonville, Fla. As we started back to the north, my parents decided to purchase pecans at a road side stand in Georgia.

At the time, I-75 was a thing of the future and markets lined the old U.S. 27 south of Macon. When my mother approached the cashier to pay for her purchase, the lady behind the cash register said, “You’re from Indiana, aren’t you?” It must be understood that at the time, we had traveled very little out of northeast Indiana.

My mother acknowledged that she was and asked the lady how she knew. The friendly cashier responded, “I could tell by your accent.”

My mother didn’t say anything until she climbed into the car. Then, with a bit of huffiness in her voice, she said to my dad, “Well, of all the nerve! How could she say that? She was the one with the accent, not me!”

 
Passalong plants & plenty of produce
Wednesday, September 11, 2013 2:16 PM

 

By Kylee Baumle

More than once I’ve heard it said that gardeners are some of the most kind and generous people you’ll ever meet. And in my experience, it's true. I doubt there’s a gardener out there that hasn't shared something from their garden.

This time of year, those of us that grow fruits and vegetables know that seldom do our plants produce just the right amount we need, whether it’s too little or too much. While many things have done well, in my own garden this wasn’t a good year for beets.

I happen to love pickled beets and could probably eat them every single day of my life, so that’s one thing you’ll always find growing in our garden. But, this year, our beet crop was pitiful. It might be because I got the seeds in the ground a bit late. Or maybe it’s because they were in a location that doesn’t get enough sun. In any case, I didn't get a single beet.

 
These are a few of my favorite trees
Wednesday, September 04, 2013 1:28 PM

By Kylee Baumle

Fall is approaching and as someone who has close to 100 trees on this acre of land we live on, this means leaf raking. Raking, because in spite of leaves being a great mulch if they’re small, ours are not.

We have several oaks that are over 200 years old, as determined by a formula for measuring, specific to oaks. As anyone who has oak trees in their yard knows, these are dirty trees, dropping not only acorns in the fall, but copious amounts of leaves. All. Year. Long.

Our property was once a woods, as much of Paulding County was. It was only in the 1970s that it was cleared for building. When we bought the two-year-old house in 1977, there were only six trees here, three oaks, two maples, and a shagbark hickory. All six are still here, although one large oak has lost its eastern half, thanks to a storm.

 
In case of emergency
Wednesday, September 04, 2013 1:27 PM

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

By Nancy Whitaker

Most of us working at the office are organized; at least we think we are. When it comes to our desks and work stations, it is pretty much up to each of us as to what we want on and in our desks.

Of course there are the necessities such as: paper clips, rulers, tape, scissors and rubber bands. Personally, I like keeping my necessities out on my desk so I can have quicker access to them.

Of course, there is the phone, the computer, and file folders on my desk which I use every day. I also have business cards, pens, pencils and a stapler. So far so good.

 
King of the road?
Wednesday, September 04, 2013 1:25 PM

King of the road?

By Nancy Whitaker

Driving etiquette should be a part of every Drivers Ed course. I, for one, hate it when someone pulls out in front of me, tailgates me, or passes me when there is another car coming. I tend to say “##*****@@@” and not very quietly either.

I can never quite understand how people can pull out in front of me and never even see me coming. A lot of times, I just wonder if they are in that big of a hurry or if they just aren’t paying attention.

A couple of weeks ago, I was driving around a parking lot and someone with a truck decided to back up. They came within inches of hitting me and I thought for sure I would wind up with a dented car. I could not back up, because someone was behind me, so I did the next logical thing I knew to do, which was lay on my horn.

 
Walk a mile in my shoes
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 3:01 PM

By Jim Langham

I can’t imagine what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a waitress, but both of my daughters used to fill me in when they came home from an evening's work at a nearby eatery.

“This one lady is so nice, she always asks us how we are doing and seems like she really cares about us.”

“There’s this couple that comes in and you can never make them happy, never! They are always going to find something wrong with their place setting, food and the way that I serve them. My heart droops every time they walk in.”

 
Wolves in sheep's clothing
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 2:59 PM

 

By Kylee Baumle

As we drive along our rural Paulding County roads, the predominate color of the landscape in August is green. It’s considerably greener this year than in past years and certainly greener than 2012, but there are little pops of color here and there.

White is a color too and there’s an abundance of Queen Anne’s lace, oftentimes interspersed with lavender chicory. The goldenrod is beginning to bloom, as is the deep purple ironweed (aptly named, if you’ve ever tried to pick some barehanded for a bouquet).

In the ditches, you can find the pink blooms of both common and swamp milkweed, although much of that is going to seed by now. But there’s a deeper pink, a more vibrant, almost neon pink that can be seen in various spots around the county.

 
Love 'em all
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 2:58 PM

 

LOVE ’EM ALL

By Nancy Whitaker

I remember my grandma telling me when I was little, “You should love everyone, but you don’t have to like their actions or their ways.”

I like to believe we have all been in love with somebody or some thing. One of the strongest bonds of love is between a mother and her children. I guess I call this, “Motherly love.”

One of my truest deepest loves is for my children and grandchildren. Even though my children are all grown up, I still worry about them, pray for them and love them with all my heart.

 
The writings of Gene Stratton-Porter
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 1:37 PM

 

By Jim Langham

There’s not a day goes by that is not inspired at some point by the writing and philosophy of an author who was referred to in her time as the “first woman botanist” in America.

 
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